Unit Tests in Unreal – pt 3 – Making Your Unreal Game Code Testable

Introduction In this part of the series, I'll ilustrate the problem to test Unreal Engine classes and one approach to write the tests. As you will probably realise, when doing unit tests a lot of problems related to how your dependencies are organised will crop up. This is one of the greatest benefits of the … Continue reading Unit Tests in Unreal – pt 3 – Making Your Unreal Game Code Testable

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Unit Tests in Unreal – pt 2 – Integrating Google Test with Unreal Engine

Introduction The idea of this part is to discuss how to integrate Google Tests with Unreal Engine. For this posts, I've used Unreal Engine 4.21.0. You can register at Epic website and they will give you access to their GitHub repo (https://github.com/EpicGames/UnrealEngine). You will need the Engine Source code, because of the dependencies on the … Continue reading Unit Tests in Unreal – pt 2 – Integrating Google Test with Unreal Engine

Unit Tests in Unreal – pt 1 – A definition of Unit Tests for this series

Introduction In this series of posts, I'll discuss some ideas about how to unit test your game code if your game uses Unreal Engine. In my recent experience in games industry, I noticed that there's a lot of misunderstandings about what unit test is and how to write unit tests. Mostly I believe, comes from … Continue reading Unit Tests in Unreal – pt 1 – A definition of Unit Tests for this series

SSL – part 4 – Getting a Real SSL Certificate

Introduction In the part 1 of this series, I described the basics around SSL. In part 2 how to create self-signed certificates. In part 3, I described how to run your own certificate authority (CA). Now, we will cover the real use case which is getting a real certificate for your server. What is the … Continue reading SSL – part 4 – Getting a Real SSL Certificate

SSL – part 3 – How to run your own Certificate Authority

Introduction In the part 1 of this series, I described the basics around SSL. In part 2 how to create self-signed certificates. Now, the idea is how to "run" your certificate authority (CA). I will use Windows Server 2016 for this example. Again, there are probably open source options or other stacks that you could … Continue reading SSL – part 3 – How to run your own Certificate Authority

SSL – part 2 – Self-Signed Certificates

Introduction In the first part, a lot of basic concepts of certificates where explored like the differences between private and public keys and the overall mechanic of SSL. In this part, the idea is to explain how a self-signed certificate works and the drawbacks. To explore this example I'll be using IIS (Internet Information Services). … Continue reading SSL – part 2 – Self-Signed Certificates